CALIFORNIA NEBULA NGC1499

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California nebula

In the dark sky and not far from the Pleiades, you can look for a beautiful California nebula in the constellation Perseus. This nebula got its name because of its resemblance to the state of California. The nebula bears the catalog name NGC 1499 and was discovered by Barnard in 1884. The nebula is about 100 light-years long and 1,500 light-years from the solar system. The photographs of this nebula are due to its beautiful shape and seductive color – which is highly valued in astrophotography. There are characteristics that make many astronomers enthusiastically search for the California nebula. Therefore, the nebula is beautiful.

Hydrogen nebula

Although the apparent magnitude of this nebula is 6. However, due to its low surface brightness and it is difficult to observe visually. Therefore, this deep sky object is difficult to observe. The image in the middle shows the bright blue star Menkib. The star has 12,000 times the brightness of our Sun, and is also known as Xi Persei. We can thank the star of Menkib for such a beautiful red color. Electrons in this region recombine with hydrogen atoms. In addition, a characteristic red light of this nebula is created. The California Nebula can be seen in the dark with an Hβ filter, and is often found in photographs – along with open clusters of Pleiades stars. A nebula is a beautiful object in the night sky. You can find it with telescopes. In conclusion, you need to see.

 

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